Wellness programs are popular additions for many employers seeking to attract top talent and keep existing employees happy with robust benefits. But do those efforts equate to a satisfied workforce? An article from CFO magazine suggests it’s not always the case.

Employees want support, not directions

Citing a study by Willis Research Towers, the article notes that “while 56% of surveyed employers said they believed that their well-being programs have encouraged employees to live a healthier lifestyle, only 32% of employees agreed.”

56% of surveyed employers said they believed that their well-being programs have encouraged employees to live a healthier lifestyle, only 32% of employees agreed.

The disconnect is partially due to the role of incentives. Though incentives have proven to be effective at getting employees to utilize wellness programs, they don’t necessarily communicate an employer’s desire to support their well-being.

Employers see utilization of incentives as proof that their wellness programs are working. But if those incentives don’t accompany broader support for improved health, employees don’t get the message that their employer cares about their health.

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Employees want more than wellness programs alone

At Vera, patients are treated by dedicated care teams including a provider, health coach, and medical staff. Working together, and in partnership with the patient, these dedicated care teams develop personalized care plans that go far beyond the scope of a bolt-on wellness program.

To get patients to benefit from this experience, incentives are used to promote initial engagement with a clinic. Once engaged, our exceptional patient experience and focus on building trusted patient-provider relationships pick up where the incentives left off, showing employees that their health is supported by a team of dedicated providers, health coaches, and medical staff.

That clinical experience is provided at an accessible on-site clinic, which is highly valued by employees. According to the Willis Research Towers study, “58% of employees whose employers offered such on-site or near-site programs agreed that their employers’ overall initiatives met their needs, versus 25% of those whose employers do not offer such programs.”

Learn more about the Vera clinical experience and how it drives patient engagement and positive health outcomes. Download our white paper: A New Clinical Experience.

 

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